Posts tagged with bread

Jeanne Kitson Banana Nut Bread Recipe

Posted on December 9, 2019 by Leave a comment

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After attempting many times to duplicate my mothers Banana Nut Bread recipe, I finally found a copy written on a 3 x 5 card. I tried it and it turned out great; “Just like Mom used to make”. This is a heavy, moist, rich loaf. If you have an extra bit of banana, don’t be afraid to throw it in the mix, that’s what mother would have done.

Banana Nut Bread Original Recipe
Banana Nut Bread Original Recipe
Banana Nut Bread Recipe Cont.
Banana Nut Bread Recipe Cont.

Ingredients:

  1. 3/4 Cup of room temperature Butter (1 1/2 Sticks)
  2. 1 Cup of Sugar
  3. 1 1/2 cups of smashed ripe or overripe bananas (about 3 medium bananas)
  4. 2 Eggs (preferably extra large)
  5. 1 teaspoon of Vanilla
  6. 2 Cups of flour (All Purpose or Bread)
  7. 1 teaspoon of Baking Soda
  8. 3/4 teaspoon of Salt
  9. 1/2 Cup of real Buttermilk, if you can get it or cultured buttermilk. I suspect any type of cows milk would substitute.
  10. 3/4 Cup of coarsely chopped Walnuts

Putting it all together:

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees
  2. Mash 3 Bananas on a cutting board
  3. In a bowl, Cream Sugar and Butter together
  4. Add Eggs and Vanilla
  5. Add 1 1/2 Cups of mashed bananas and Buttermilk
  6. Add Flour, Salt, and Baking Soda
  7. Mix together thoroughly
  8. Pour into a greased, floured 9″ x 5″ loaf pan or line the pan with parchment paper
  9. Bake at 325 degrees for 1:15 or until done. Check with a tooth pick or knife in several places. This loaf will fool you and appear done when it is not. The rule of thumb would be not to take it out early.

Jeanne Kitson Banana Nut Bread
Jeanne Kitson Banana Nut Bread

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Gaspe Bread

Posted on March 28, 2016 by Leave a comment

In the early 1960s, I traveled with my family on a two week vacation trip from Buffalo NY, through New England, north through Maine into the Canadian Province of Quebec to the Gaspe Peninsula. We returned to Buffalo by crossing the St. Lawrence river further into Quebec, passing through Quebec City, Montreal, Toronto and back home. The Gaspe Peninsula, at that time, was a very rural area inhabited mainly by fishermen and small agricultural communities. The area was very economically depressed and families sold home made souvenirs, bake goods, hazel nuts, and wooden sailboats along the roadside to make extra money. French is the native language in the Province of Quebec. This was before interstates and fast food restaurants. We were camping in a small tent trailer pulled by the family station wagon. There is a famous and beautiful rock formation just off shore near the town of Perce which is a tourist destination. It was a wonderful, once in a lifetime trip!

Typical family Gaspe bread oven along the road, circa 1961

Typical family Gaspe bread oven along the road, circa 1961

We traveled a two lane road that followed the shore of the North Atlantic Ocean. Families along the roadside and the occasional souvenir stand, sold fresh baked bread, baked outside, in an outside “pizza” oven. It seemed like almost every house had an outdoor wood fired oven. Near the oven, you would see fresh baked bread and possibly loaves of dough rising in the warm sun. The loaves of bread would be set out on a table for sale. As I recall, purchasing the loaves was self service, and after selecting your loaf to buy, you simply put your payment in a box or a coffee can. This bread had a wonderful smell and flavor, being crusty on the outside and moist on the inside. We would have purchased sliced ham, bologna, or extra sharp cheddar cheese to make simple sandwiches with this bread. It was delicious!!

Gaspe oven and bread for sale, circa 1961

Gaspe oven and bread for sale, circa 1961

Recently I went on a quest to find a recipe for this bread, but could only find one, photo copied from an old 1961 newspaper article. The article was not printable. I have copied this recipe and have reproduced it here. The article noted that there were numerous recipes used by many Gaspe bread makers and this is just one example. After baking the bread, it has the same smell, flavor and texture that I remember. The full recipe makes two loaves. I added a list of ingredients for one loaf. The only adjustment is to shorten the baking time for the single loaf to maybe 30-35 minutes.

My sister suggested using the left over “potato” water from the mashed potatoes. We tried that and it worked just fine. Just be sure to let the water cool enough so it will not kill the yeast.

Homemade Bread From The Gaspe
By Cecily Brownstone (Retyped from the original article by Mark Kitson 3/15/2016)
Lakeland Ledger, Thursday, October 5th, 1961

Fresh baked and ready to cut

Fresh baked and ready to cut

Gaspe Bread
2 Loaves
2 Cups very warm water (105-115 degrees)
3 packages of yeast
1 Cup lukewarm mashed potatoes
2 Tablespoons sugar
1 Tablespoon salt
2 Tablespoons butter or margarine
7 Cups (about) of sifted flour

1 Loaf
1 Cup very warm water
1 ½ packages of yeast
½ Cup lukewarm mashed potatoes
1 Tablespoon sugar
1 ½ teaspoons salt
1 Tablespoon butter or margarine
3 ½ Cups of sifted flour

Luke warm mashed potatoes

Luke warm mashed potatoes

In a mixing bowl, stir water and yeast together until yeast is dissolved. Add lukewarm potatoes, sugar, salt, butter and 2 Cups of flour. Beat two minutes at medium speed on electric mixer or 300 vigorous strokes with a spoon. Stir in enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough.

Turn out on a lightly floured board and knead until elastic – about 10 minutes. (The dough will be slightly rough and dull looking). Place in a greased bowl turning once to grease all sides. Cover and let rise in a warm place (80-85 degrees), that is free from draft, until doubled in bulk – about 30 minutes.

Let the dough double in size

Let the dough double in size

Punch down dough, cover and let rise again until doubled – about 20 minutes. Punch dough down and divide in half. Shape each half into a ball. Press into two greased 8 inch layer cake pans and let rise again until doubled in bulk – about 20 minutes. Bake in a hot (400 degrees) oven about 40 minutes (30-35 minutes for a single loaf). Remove from pans and let cool on wire racks away from a draft.

Crusty on the outside, moist on the inside

Crusty on the outside, moist on the inside

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Italian Meatballs

Posted on March 9, 2016 by Leave a comment

Italian meatballs are something every cook should know how to make. Spaghetti and meatballs, or meatball submarine sandwiches are something almost everyone enjoys. Once made, meatballs can be served fresh or frozen for future use. This recipe is one that we have used for years. On this occasion it seems like we were short on some ingredients, so we made some substitutions along the way which did not effect the outcome. This recipe can be cut in half if you only have a pound of beef or pork. We have never made this recipe with just pork, but we have made the recipe with only ground beef, many, many times. This is a relatively soft meatball that we simmer in spaghetti sauce after the meatballs are cooked, to add additional flavor to both the meatballs and the sauce.

Simmer until done!

Simmer until done!

Ingredients
1) 1 Pound ground beef
2) 1 Pound round pork (we used ground pork labeled 80/200
3) 2 Eggs
4) 1 Cup of bread crumbs or 8 slices of store bought white bread
5) 1 Cup of either water or milk
6) 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of salt
7) 2 teaspoons of crushed dried oregano
8) 2 Tablespoons of fresh parsley or dried parsley
9) 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of black pepper
10) 1/2 cup of parmesan cheese; fresh grated or prepared grated
11) Garlic lovers will want to add fresh garlic or garlic powder; a clove or two or 1/2-1 teaspoon of garlic powder
12) Extra virgin olive oil to cook the meatballs
13) Spagetti sauce enough to cover the cooked meatballs

Start with ground beef

Start with ground beef

Add ground pork

Add ground pork

Putting it all together

1) In a large bowl add ground beef broken into small pieces
2) Add ground pork broken into small pieces
3) Add the two eggs
4) Add the bread crumbs. If using bread slices, pour the milk or water over the bread as you add the slices to the bowl
5) Add water or milk
6) Add Salt, Oregano, Parsley, Pepper, Parmesan Cheese and garlic for the garlic lovers
7) Mix all the ingredients until uniform (we do this by hand, being sure to wash our hands when we are done handling the meat)
8) Warm a skillet on medium heat, with olive oil enough to thinly cover the bottom of your skillet
9) Form the meat into balls (the size is dependent on your preference) and start simmering and turning as they cook. (we make them about 1 1/4 to 1 1/5 inches in diameter)
10) To help the meatballs cook, we cover the simmering meatballs with a lid and continue to turn them for even cooking
11 When the meatballs are cooked, you can drain any extra fat or oil, if preferred
12) If freezing the meatballs, let the meatballs cool and prepare them for freezing
13) If cooking for a meal, we add enough spaghetti sauce to, at least, cover the meatballs, and let them simmer for about one half hour
14) The meatballs and sauce are ready to serve!!

Add bread crumbs, eggs & seasonings

Add bread crumbs, eggs & seasonings

Add parsley and parmesan

Add parsley and parmesan

Mix all the ingredients uniformly

Mix all the ingredients uniformly

Roll into meatballs and simmer on medium heat

Roll into meatballs and simmer on medium heat

Italian Sausage Meatballs

If you want to have a meatball that has more of an Italian Sausage flavor you can simply add whole fennel seeds and red pepper flakes. You can add these ingredients to your own taste adding more fennel seed for a stronger fennel flavor and more pepper flakes for a hotter meatball. A good starting point might be a level tablespoon of fennel seeds, and a level teaspoon of pepper flakes for the recipe above.

Add fennel seed and red pepper flakes to make an Italian Sausage meatball

Add fennel seed and red pepper flakes to make an Italian Sausage meatball

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Swiss Christmas Bread “Weck”

Posted on January 13, 2016 by Leave a comment

Swiss Christmas Bread or “Weck” is a recipe that has been handed down in our family going on seven generations. My father always referred to it as “Weck”. I cannot find a similar reference to “Weck” on the internet? This swiss recipe has been passed down from our ancestors in Switzerland. The recipe my father made included only muscat raisins, which are difficult to find today. We have adjusted the recipe over the years to include regular raisins, and candied red and/or green cherries. Other additions could include candied citron peel, walnuts, or other nut types. This recipe can be made with a heavy wooden mixing spoon or a Kichen Aid Mixer.

Giving a friend or neighbor a loaf of this special bread is a great gift!! We deliver ours when it is still warm. Extra loaves can also be frozen and enjoyed later.

Swiss Christmas Bread "Weck"

Swiss Christmas Bread “Weck”

This recipe makes 3 loaves as pictured.

Ingredients:
6 1/2 Cups of flour (we use bread flour)
2 packages of Yeast (we use rapid rise yeast)
1 3/4 Cups of milk (fat free, 1%, 2% 4%, it does’t matter)
1/2 Cup of real butter (not margarine)
2/3 Cup of very warm tap water (but not so hot as to kill the yeast)
1/2 Cup of sugar (cane sugar or beet sugar, doesn’t matter)
1/2 teaspoon of salt
2 grated lemon rinds
2 Cups of raisins (one cup can be substituted with something else like candied cherries)
2 Eggs (we use extra large)
A 1/4 teaspoon of sugar to add to the yeast.
An additional scrambled egg to put an egg wash on the loaf just prior to baking.

Putting it all together:
1) Grate the rind of the 2 lemons (we use the fine side of a regular four sided grater or a very fine Microplane).
2) In a small bowl combine the warm tap water, yeast, and a 1/4 teaspoon of sugar and wait for the yeast to proof (we use a 2 cup pyrex glass measuring cup).
3) In a large bowl, combine the flour, salt, sugar, grated lemon rind, and raisins (see Kitchen Tips below).
5) In a small sauce pan, on low heat, combine milk and butter and scald (not boil) (see kitchen Tips below).
6) In a small bowl, beat the 2 eggs.
7) In the large bowl with the flour make 3 “pockets”, one for the eggs, one for the milk, and one for the yeast.
8) Add all the ingredients into the flour and mix into a dough with a heavy wood spoon.
9) You may need to add some extra flour if the dough is too sticky. Knead the dough.
10) When you have a nice ball of dough, set aside in a covered bowl to rise for about an hour.
11) Prepare 3 baking greased baking pans. We use a medium pizza pan. Other pans will work like a pie pan or round cake pan).
12) Preheat the oven at 375 degrees.
13) When the dough has risen, punch it down and form into 3 equal sized balls.
14) Flatten one ball at a time and put a hole in the middle like a doughnut with a small hole in the middle. Place in or on the baking pan.
15) Let rise for an addition hour.
16) For decoration you can cut with a scissors a decoration pattern in the dough with a series of very small cuts. We make a circle of cuts around the circumference.
17) Egg Wash – In a small bowl, scramble an egg and brush a thin coat over the entire loaf of Weck.
18) Bake for 20 – 25 minutes at 375.
19) Cool on a cooking rack
20) Serve when cool enough to cut, while still warm, with real butter.

Best eaten when it is still warm from being in the oven!!

Best eaten when it is still warm from being in the oven!!

Kitchen Tips!
1) Coating Fruit with Flour: Sometimes the raisins are in sticky clumps in a box. When you add raisins to the flour, separate the raisins individually as you add them to the flour. Coat them with the flour in the bowl as you add a few at a time. The same is true of candied cherries. We cut the cherries in half with a scissors as we add them the flour.
2) Adding Fruit and Nuts: We use either 2 cups of raisins, or one cup of raisins and 1/2 cup of red candied cherries, and 1/2 cup of green candied cherries. Similar ratios of other ingredients like candied citron peel or nuts can be added. The total of fruit and nuts should not exceed 2 cups.
3) Scalding: Scalding means bringing a liquid mixture to near boiling, but not boiling. If in doubt, turn off the heat when the liquid is very warm, but not boiling. In bread making, scalding the milk serves a scientific purpose. The whey protein in milk can weaken gluten and prevent the dough from rising properly. Scalding the milk deactivates the protein so this doesn’t happen (per The Kitchn). Be sure to let the scalded milk cool below 100 degrees before adding to the recipe. If you can comfortably put your finger in the milk, it should be ok.

Makes: 3 loaves
Prep time: About 3 to 3 1/2 hours
– 30 minutes to make the dough
– First rise 1 hour
– Second rise 1 hour
Cook time: 25 minutes

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