Posts tagged with seed

Fall Food Plots – Trying New Seed Mixes

Posted on September 14, 2017 by Leave a comment

We haven’t planted new food plots since 2014 and it is time (Summer 2017) to plant some fall annual food plots in preparation for perennial food plots in 2018. We have a half acre of three year old Imperial Whitetail™ Brand Clover which needs to replaced in 2018 with at least an acre of Whitetail Clover. This late summer (August 5th) we planted six seed mixes from the Whitetail Institute. We have found reliability and innovation with Whitetail Institute products and seldom try other brands. Seed selection is one of the most important aspects of planting food plots. This time we are planting Pure Attraction®, Ambush®, Winter Greens™, Beets & Greens™, Tall Tine Tubers™ and Imperial Whitetail Oats Plus™. These are all annual seed blends and should be killed during the winter in this western New York location.

3 year old neglected Imperial Whitetail Clover food plot

3 year old neglected Imperial Whitetail Clover food plot

We started in June preparing for this planting with a late burn down. I say late because of very rainy spring weather. We did not apply the first application of glyphosate until the weeds were about 18 inches tall in most places. We used a heavy rate of glyphosate to control perennial weeds, with quackgrass being our biggest concern. We made a second application about the third week of July. To attempt to control quackgrass, you must make a second application when it re-grows following the first application. Since we are planting fall annual food plots, we will have another opportunity to control the quackgrass, if it regrows. We will make another burn down application next spring, before we plant our perennial planting of Whitetail Clover.

Food plot "Burn Down" number two

Food plot “Burn Down” number two

When we look at food plot seed blends in advertising and online, we get an idea of what is in the package, but to know exactly what is in the package you must read the Seed Label on the package you purchase. The seed label is required by the USDA (United States Department of Agriculture). This label will tell you the specific varieties, percent pure seed, germination percentage, origin of the seed (state), percent weed seed, percent inert matter, germination test date, amount of noxious weeds, container weight, etc.

Here is the seed label information for the varieties in the seed bags we purchased: These seed mixes contain a high percentage of coating material which is very important to the germination and weight distribution of the seed as it goes out a broadcast seed spreader. It is better to ensure that the seed you plant will grow than to purchase uncoated seed that may not germinate in adverse conditions. The coating is All-Vantage containing RainBond which will also helps water adhere to the seed in dry conditions.

Tall Tine Tubers: We like Tall Tine Tubers which we have grown before. The turnips provide foliage for the deer to eat after a freeze in the fall and the turnip “bulbs” to eat throughout the winter and early spring.
Tall Tine Turnip – 55.24%
Purple Top Turnip – 10.48%
Other Crop – 0%
Weed Seed – 0.05%
Inert Matter (includes 34.18% Coating Material)

Beets & Greens: This is the first time we have planted this seed mix. We are excited to see how the sugar beets in this mix preform. We have grown the other plants in the mix previously including Radish, Kale, Rape, and Tall Tine Turnips. It appears to be a mix that will nourish deer in late fall and possibly through winter and early spring. We had difficulty calibrating our hand held seeder to spread this seed because of the size difference between the larger beet seed and the smaller brassica/turnip seed. When we opened the seeder up to accommodate the beet seed, it let out too many brassicas. We feel this was the cause of our planting too much seed on a smaller area than the 1/2 acre intended. We may need to look at other seeder options.
WINA 412 Radish – 25.59%
WINA 210 Kale – 18.87%
Trophy Rape – 18.26%
Newbie Sugar Beet – 14.81%
Tall Tine Turnip – 2.95%
Other crop – 0.05%
Inert Matter – (includes 19.04 % coating material)
Weed Seed – 0.05%

Winter Greens: This is a good all around annual fall food plot mix. We have planted this previously. The deer will come in to eat it after a frost or two. In our area in western N.Y. State, it will be consumed from about mid Oct. until it gets really cold in mid January, maybe longer if there is snow cover. The deer will dig through the snow for it!
WINA 210 Forage Kale – 24.32%
Premier Forage Kale – 24.28 %
Dwarf Essex Rape – 4.44%
Trophy Rape – 3.29%
Dwarf Siberian Kale – 3.28%
Purple Top Turnip – 0.79%
Other crop – 0.05%
Inert Matter (includes 34.2% Coating Material)
Weed Seed – 0.08%

Ambush: This is a new seed mix for us and we are anxious to see how the lupines, peas, Alex Berseem Clover, sugar beets and Annual Ryegrass do in this mix. Our initial impression is that this mix germinated slowly, and the Alex Berseem Clover, and lupines germinate and develop slowly. Since the pea and lupine seed are large seeds and the percents in the seed mix are derived by weight, there are really not many lupine and pea seeds that have an opportunity to germinate. We’ll have to see how it looks in October and how much the deer feed on it. In our case, we may also need to change our planting procedure to make sure the bigger lupine and pea seeds are covered with more soil to get a higher germination percentage.
Amiga White Lupine – 25.88%
WINA 204 Peas – 19.80
Lumen White Lupine – 15.97
Whitetail 906590 Oats – 11.96
Alex Beseem Clover – 9.88
Newbie Sugar Beet – 5.98%
DH-3 Annual Ryegrass – 4.99
Other crop – 0.05%
Inert Matter (includes 5.10% Coating Material)
Weed Seed -0.06%

Pure Attraction: This is a new seed mix for us. We really like Whitetail Oats and this was an attractive mix to us since we wanted to combine some other seed types with our oat planting. One of the attributes we like about the “sweet” oats is that the deer will start eating it almost immediately, where we have to wait for frosts for many of the “greens”.

Whitetail 906590 Oats – 38.89%
Whitetail 105069 Oats – 35.87
Fridge Triticale – 12.34%
Bolero Peas – 4.41%
Brundage Wheat – 3.72%
WINA 210K Forage Kale -1.045
Premier Forage Kale – 1.04%
Dwarf Essex Rape – 0.225
Tall Tine Turnip – 0.22%
Trophy Rape – 0.14%
Dwarf Siberian Kale – 0.14%
Other Crop – 0.07%
Inert Matter (includes 5.10% Coating Material)
Weed Seed – 0.07%

Imperial Whitetail Oats Plus we have planted previously several times. I do not currently have the seed label for the seed we planted, but I can add that later. The majority of this seed is uncoated oat seed. We really like this product! The deer feed on it almost immediately and will continue to feed on it until it is frozen out in our area. It continues to grow and the deer keep it pruned almost down to the ground. Due to abnormal growing conditions and our first time experimentation using a UTV as a cultipacker, we chose to over seed our entire planting this year with a half rate of the “sweet” oats. So far, this has proven to be a benefit, although we did get excellent germination for almost all our seed mixes.

Imperial Whitetail Oats over-seeded at half rate over all plantings

Imperial Whitetail Oats over-seeded at half rate over all plantings

Our planting process this year included two burn-down applications primarily to control perennial quack grass, followed by three discings, planting, then fertilizing. We would like to have incorporated the fertilizer in with the discings, however with approaching rains we wanted to make sure we had the seed planted, and germination confirmed before we committed to purchasing fertilizer. We also felt we probably had enough phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) to get the plants going. There might be an advantage of making one late heavy N-P-K application after germination verses a split application of an early N-P-K application followed by a later Nitrogen (N) application. Ideally you would make the two fertilizer applications. We’ll see how big the turnips and sugar beets get by November 15th?

Imperial Whitetail Oats Plus germinating!

Imperial Whitetail Oats Plus germinating!

We try to follow the seeding rate on the package, usually I purchase 1/2 acre bags of seed. Sometimes it is a challenge to get the rate correctly and achieve optimum spacing between plants. If the seeding rate is to close, you get a lot of spindly plants. If it is too thin, you get gaps which allow weeds to get established. Particularly with turnips, radishes and sugar beets, if they are planted too thickly, the root bulb will be small. For these rooting plants you want them planted thin enough to grow big “bulbs”. Having enough fertilizer will also help grow big bulbs if the plants have enough space.

Always exciting to see good germination and plant spacing!

Always exciting to see good germination and plant spacing!

An example of planting too thickly

An example of planting too thickly

We had one area that we decided to turn into a food plot late in the summer and it only received a mowing and one burn down application. It was very trashy even after it had been disced about 4 times. We planted extra seed and oversewed it with the “Sweet” oats. It appears to have had good germination and we expect this plot to do well.

Good germination in a really trashy area!

Good germination in a really trashy area!

After germination it is great to watch the plants get established and in some cases fight for light and dominance with their neighbors. If you can’t get your seeding rate perfect, it’s better to plant extra seed than not have enough planted in our opinion.

Oats and Brassicas getting established! Tillering - Sinking roots!

Oats and Brassicas getting established! Tillering – Sinking roots!

Our most shady/secluded plot getting established!

Our most shady/secluded plot getting established!

We have one newly cleared area where we have cut down relatively large trees to expand our food plot area and to let more light in on or existing plots. We have cut the trees, harvested the firewood, burned the branches and have planted this area for the first time. This creates the need to disc the soil and plant around the stumps. We do not plan to remove the stumps and all our food plots have stumps in varying stages of decay.

Planting around the stumps!

Planting around the stumps!

We have planted about 2 1/2 acres of food plots this year, some is planted in between rows of english walnut trees that we have planted. We have our first nut on a tree this year! We did not plant blocks of the same seed mix types, but alternated seed mix types in about 30 foot bands throughout the plots. In previous years we have planted in blocks which resulted in some plots being pretty bare after the deer at almost everything. With this approach all the plots should have something growing throughout the entire hunting season.

Multiple Food Plots with Multiple Seed Mixes Planted

Multiple Food Plots with Multiple Seed Mixes Planted

With the food plots established and the expectation that big bucks from all over will come to flock into these food plots, we decided to build a simple hunting stand to overlook about 2/3 of the plots. At the very least it will give us a place to sit, out of the rain, in a comfortable chair while we watch the show.

Simple Hunting Stand

Simple Hunting Stand

™ ®

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Seeds of Change® has the best seed packets!!

Posted on February 20, 2016 by Leave a comment

Seeds of Change® brand seeds are offered for sale at our local Home Depot. We also receive a catalog in the mail and you can order online at www.seedsofchange.com. This company markets organic seeds. Although we feel the benefits of organic farming are greatly exaggerated, they offer a large variety of seeds for sale and we love their seed packaging. We wish all seed companies packaged their seeds this way.

Resealable seed packets!

Resealable seed packets!

Here is a list of the benefits of we observe in their packaging.
1) Made of moisture proof plastic. If you get water on it the ink doesn’t run, the paper doesn’t get wet and the seeds stay dry.
2) Resealable so seeds are not lost unintentionally as long as the package has been resealed.
3) Easy to open with the simple tear-off strip.
4) The back of the package is bilingual and provides a graphic display to help gardeners who speak other languages.
5) Is hermetically sealed.
6) Great color photo graphs and print.

The tear-off is removed easily!

The tear-off is removed easily!

The seed packets cost more than some seed companies and less than others. We would expect to pay more for the organic seed which is justified and a premium for the superior packaging. The packaging is value added and we appreciate the extra effort to keep the seed viable even after the package has been opened. We often keep left over seed from year to year and this packaging helps preserve the germination potential.

Informative seed package backside

Informative seed package backside

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Coke Bottle Greenhouse

Posted on February 10, 2016 by Leave a comment

A simple and inexpensive way to start a seedling or two is to use a small coke bottle to make a miniature greenhouse. This can be done with other plastic containers as well. We picked this bottle type because it narrows in the middle. The middle can then be cut away and the top portion of the bottle will fit over the bottom portion, creating a removable “greenhouse” lid. It is important that the seedling can be easily removed once mature enough for transplanting outside. Using jiffy pellets, a small peat pot or containing the potting mix in a newspaper shell are obvious options.

Cut the bottle in half and remove part of the narrow section

Cut the bottle in half and remove part of the narrow section

Once the seeds are planted in the potting soil, it will take a few days for them to germinate. We usually plant a few more seeds than required to make sure we have successful germination. Once the seeds germinate they can be thinned to meet your requirements.

Miniature Greenhouse

Miniature Greenhouse

It is important to cut small drainage holes in the bottom of the bottle. This allows excess water to be removed and air to become available to the roots.

Cut drainage holes in the bottom

Cut drainage holes in the bottom

For ventilation, a small hole in the bottle cap will help or the entire top half of the lid can be removed or the bottle cap, . Ventilation is required as the temperature and the amount of sunlight increases. If too much heat develops in the bottle, it can kill or injure the seedlings.

Remove the cap for ventilation

Remove the cap for ventilation

Moisture needs to be added as required for germination and continued growth. After germination it is a good practice to let the potting soil dry a little between waterings, but you never want the seedling to be dry enough to wilt.

Potting soil, Temperature and Moisture Control, Drainage

Potting soil, Temperature and Moisture Control, Drainage

The hole added to the top of the bottle cap and also the drainage holes can be made with several tool choices. We used the reamer/punch on a Swiss Army Knife. A drill bit could also be used.

Add a small ventilation hole in the cap

Add a small ventilation hole in the cap

Post Update 2/24/16

We decided to try 2″ Jiffy® pots to see if they would fit into the bottom of the small coke bottles. They fit perfectly and will make it easy to remove the mature transplant for planting. Since each Coke bottle bottom has drain holes, we needed an inexpensive container to hold the planter. We used a large fruit juice container (64 oz.?) We cut out the side and left the cap on. I worked great for holding 3 planters.

Using 2" Jiffy® Pots

Using 2″ Jiffy® Pots

We also found that the juice bottle containers will fit well with some six pack seedling containers if you need to hold your seedlings for a few days before planting.

Using juice containers as growing containers

Using juice containers as growing containers

The Coke bottle tops are working well acting as a mini-treehouse, and for ventilation at the same time. They hold the humidity near the seedling and also let heat escape. We use the caps with the small hole when the weather turns cold for a few days.

Opening Coke bottle tops for ventilation

Opening Coke bottle tops for ventilation

Update 2/26/16

We really like the results we have achieved from the Coke Bottle mini greenhouses. Our transplants are almost ready to be transplanted into the garden. It appears they will be easy to transplant with very little damage to the seedling in the process. We have come to prefer this method of raising the transplants vs. other methods.

We liked the Coke® bottle mini greenhouses best

We liked the Coke® bottle mini greenhouses best

We did need to fertilize the seedlings several times. The amount of nutrients in the potting soil was not sufficient to supply the necessary fertility until the seedling was ready for transplanting. The seedlings do require a lot of daily maintenance, including watering, managing sunlight availably, daytime and nighttime temperatures and wind. The seedlings also need to be thinned, most often, to one plant per unit.

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Seed, Fruit Trees, and Plant Catalogs

Posted on January 29, 2016 by Leave a comment

Around the end of the year and certainly in the month of January, seed catalogs start arriving in the mail if you are on the mailing list. We have received these catalogs for many years. It is a great source of entertainment for us to read through these catalogs and watch as new and improved varieties appear and other less popular varieties disappear from these catalogs. Seed catalogs are a great source of information about when to plant, how deep to plant, harvest date, and many other tidbits of information that help you successfully grow the seeds. Catalog seeds many times have more seeds in the packet, for the same or a lower price, compared to retail store packets.

One misleading designation on many of these catalogs is that the seed is non GMO. This is a non issue with probably 99% of the catalog listings. GMO crops are mostly limited to major agricultural crops like corn, soybeans, cotton, alfalfa and a few other crops which would be unlikely to be grown in a home garden. We are not aware of any GMO sweet corn commercially available through a seed catalog. You can basically ignore the GMO issue in these catalogs. Additionally, there is no evidence to support that GMO crops are harmful to humans. We are supporters of GMO crops!! GMO crops are necessary to feed the total world population!

R.H. Shumway's

R.H. Shumway’s

R.H Shumway’s
Catalog Fulfillment Center
334 W. Stroud Street Ste. 1
Randolph, WI 53956-1274
800-342-9461
www.rhshumway.com

Each different seed catalog company seems to specialize in some aspect of seed sales. Some these companies not only offer seeds for commercial vegetable producers as well as home gardeners. Some specialize only in home garden seeds. In the commercial catalogs, not all the seeds are offered in packet sizes for home gardeners.

Stokes Seeds

Stokes Seeds

Stokes Seeds
PO Box 548
Buffalo, NY 14240-0548
800-396-9238
www.stokeseeds.com

Harris Seeds has a great catalog for both commercial producers and home gardeners.

Harris Seeds

Harris Seeds

Harris Seeds
355 Paul Road
P.O. Box 24966
Rochester, NY 14624-0966
800-544-7938
www.harrisseeds.com

The Totally Tomatoes seed catalog focuses mainly on tomatoes and peppers.

Totally Tomatoes & Seeds n Such

Totally Tomatoes

Totally Tomatoes
334 West Stroud Street
Randolph, WI 53956
800-345-5977
www.totallytomato.com

Seeds n Such is a small catalog that offers a variety of seeds with an affordable combined offer packet price and a good number of seeds per packet.

Seeds n Such

Seeds n Such

Seeds n Such
PO Box 1
Graniteville, SC 29829
803-663-1501
www.seedsnsuch.com

One of the benefits of buying through the mail or ordering on line from a seed catalog is that there are sometimes more than one packet size. You also have a great deal more variety choices. Sometimes there are early order discounts or quantity discounts.

Vermont Been Seed Company

Vermont Been Seed Company

Vermont Bean Seed Company
334 W. Stroud St.
Randolph, WI 53956
800-349-1071
www.vermontbean.com

Some seed catalogs do a very good job of explaining how to grow each crop category. These tips can make a big difference specially if you are a beginning gardener, although long time gardeners can learn too. This is very true if you are going to plant something you have not grown before. Additionally, seed catalogs usually have a section dedicated to products and gadgets that may help you grow better or accomplish tasks more efficiently.

Territorial Seed Company

Territorial Seed Company

Territorial Seed Company
P.O. Box 158
Cottage Grove, OR 97424-0061
800-626-0866
www.territorialseed.com

This is the first year that we have received a seed catalog specializing in organic seeds. Although we feel that the benefits of organic gardening are greatly exaggerated, it is good to have seed a company attempting to meet the demands of this growing market.

Seeds of Change
PO Box 152
Spicer, MN 56288
888-762-7333
www.seedsofchange.com

Seeds of Change - organic seeds

Seeds of Change – organic seeds

Most gardeners that purchase seeds also have an interest in planting small fruit and fruit tree transplants. Stark Nursery acquired many of the varieties that were previously sold by Miller Nursery in Canandaigua, NY. Miller Nursery ceased operations about two years ago. We have been a big fan of Miller Nursery as well as Stark Nursery.

Stark Bro's for Fruit Trees

Stark Bro’s for Fruit Trees

Stark Bro’s Nurseries & Orchards Co. (Apples, Peaches, Apricots, Pears, Grapes)
PO Box 1800
Louisiana, MO 63353
800-325-4180
www.starkbros.com

Another of our favorite nurseries in Nourse Farms. In our opinion, Nourse is the preferred supplier on the east coast for strawberry, raspberry, and other small fruit and vegetable varieties including rhubarb, horse radish, and asparagus.

Nourse for small fruit plants

Nourse for small fruit plants

Nourse (small fruits, asparagus, rhubarb, horse radish)
41 River Road
South Deerfield, MA 01373
413-665-2658
www.noursefarms.com

Indian Berry & Plant Co.

Indian Berry & Plant Co.

Indiana Berry & Plant Company (Strawberry, Raspberries, Blackberries, Blueberries, Grapes)
2811 Michigan Road
Plymouth, IN 46563
800-295-2226
www.indianaberry.com

Park Seed Co.
3507 Cokesbury Road
Hodges, SC 29653
800-845-3369
www.parkseed.com

Park Seed

Park Seed

Burpee
W. Atlee Burpee & Co.
300 Park Avenue
Warminster, PA 18974
800-888-1447
www.burpee.com

Ball Horticultural Company
622 Town Road
West Chicago, IL 60185-2698
800-879-2255
www.ballseed.com/webtrack

Adaptive Seeds
25079 Brush Creek Road
Sweet Home, OR 97386
541-367-1105
www.adaptiveseeds.com

Botanical Interests
660 Compton Street
Broomfield, CO 80020
877-821-4340
www.botanicalinterests.com

Burgess Seed & Plant Co.
1804 E. Hamilton Road
Bloomington, IL 61704-9609
309-662-7761
www.eburgess.com

ChilePlants.com (seasonal) (plants not seed) (best selection of eggplant varieties)
Cross Country Nursery
PO Box 170
199 Kingwood Lockdown Road
Rosemont, NJ 08556
908-996-4646
www.chileplants.com

Companion Plants (herbs, dyes, culinary, medicinal)
7247 N Coolville Ridge Road
Athens, OH 45701
740-592-4643
www.companionplants.com

Dixondale Farms (onion plants)(Yello Granex “Vidalia” onions)
PO Box 129
Carrizo Springs, TX 78834
877-367-1015
www.dixondalefarms.com

Grandpa’s Orchard LLC (fruit trees)
PO Box 773
Coloma, MI 49038
877-800-0077
www.grandpasorchard.com

Irish Eyes Garden Seeds (potatoes)
5045 Robinson Canyon Road
Ellensburg, WA 98926
509-933-7150
www.irisheyesgardenseeds.com

Johnny's Selected Seeds

Johnny’s Selected Seeds

Johnny’s Selected Seeds
955 Benton Ave.
Winslow, Maine 04901
877-564-6697
www.johnnyseeds.com

J.W. Jung Seed Co
335 S. High Street
Randolph, WI 53957-0001
800-274-5864
www.jungseed.com

Raintree Nursery (west coast fruit tree nursery)
391 Butts Road
Morton, WA 98356
800-391-8892
www.raintreenursery.com

Royal Anne Organics (garlic)
4320 Royal Anne Drive
Hood River, OR 97031
503-432-1822
www.royalanneorganics.com

Sand Hill Preservation Center (Preserving old cultivars)
1878 230th Street
Calamus, IA 52729
563-246-2299
www.sandhillpreservation.com

Seed Savers Exchange
3094 N Winn Road
Decorah, IA 52101
563-382-5990
www.seedsavers.org

Seed Treasures (heirloom/open-pollinated/non GMO
8533 Co 25
Angora, MN 55703
no phone# found
www.seedtreasures.com

Southern Exposure Seed Exchange
PO Box 460
Mineral, VA 23117
540-894-9480
www.southernexposure.com

Sow True Seed
146 Church Street
Asheville, NC 28801
828-254-0708
www.sowtrueseed.com

Tomato Growers Supply Co.
PO Box 60015
Fort Meyers, FL 33906
800-345-5977
www.tomatogrowers.com

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Simple Germination Test

Posted on January 26, 2016 by Leave a comment

The simple seed germination test provides you with the information to decide whether to plant the seed you have or buy new seed.

When you buy new seed to plant in the current year, the seed packet or bag of seed, will tell you the year that the seed was packed for and the germination percentage. Seed companies are required to furnish this information. Seed for sale is normally harvested the previous year and will normally have the highest germination percentage. Standard seed germination rates for vegetable crops range from 40% to 80%. However, the germination rate can be much higher. I am holding a new packet of turnip seed with a germination percentage of 96%. If the seed is not planted in the year it was packed for, it will normally lose viability or percent germination.

Seed is a living thing and usually only needs water, and room temperature to germinate. The longer the time between seed packaging and seed planting the lower the seed germination percentage will be. If the seed is stored in cool temperatures and moderate humidity, more of the seed viability will be preserved. Some seeds deteriorate faster than others. Just because the seed is a couple years old, it is not necessarily ready to throw in the trash. There is a simple germination test that you can do to test the current germination percentage.

How many of these corn seeds will germinate?

How many of these corn seeds will germinate?

Take about 20 seeds and place them in a moist paper towel (not wet) and fold the paper towel so all that seeds are contained within the moist paper towel. Separate the seeds so they are not all bunched together, because you will want to count them in about 5 days. Then place the paper towel in a quart ziplock bag and seal the bag. Place the bag near a window where it can get some light, but not direct sunlight, where it will maintain room temperature of 70 degrees more or less. After 5 to 7 days you will gently open the paper towel to observe how many seeds have germinated and how many have not.

Wrap the seed in a moist paper towel and place it in a ziplock bag

Wrap the seed in a moist paper towel and place it in a ziplock bag

To calculate the germination percentage divide the number of seed germinated by the total number of sees evaluated. In this case we have 11 corn seeds germinated out of 20 total seeds (11/20 = .55 or 55%). If normal germination was 80%, we need to plant about 31% more seed in order to achieve a complete stand (80-55)/80=31. Most of the time the seeding rate is printed on the seed packet or tag. The seeding rate includes the space between the rows and the space between the seeds in the row.

The simple germination test

The simple germination test

If the results of a germination test shows the germination percentage much lower than normal, the seed may also lack seedling vigor. In other words the seed may germinate but be unable to push the growing point up through the soil in difficult conditions. If you have the time and garden space, you can just plant and see what comes up! If it does’t grow, you can replant!

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