Honey Archives

Genesee Valley Produce Auction – Open for 2016

Posted on May 24, 2016 by Leave a comment

Since we wrote our last blog about the Genesee Valley Produce Auction, we have been asked, where it is, how to contact the auction, and how to get there? We called and verified that our information for 2016 is up to date. We hope our directions and updates help you have a great day at the auction!!

Genesee Valley Produce Auction
8855 County Road 3
Centerville, NY 14029

1/4 mile east of “downtown” Centerville on the road towards Hume/Fillmore, NY.
Centerville is a small town in northwest Allegany County, NY, at a crossroads. The most notable business in downtown Centerville is Uncle Tom’s Kabin which is a small grocery store. Go 1/4 mile towards Hume/Fillmore and The Genesee Valley Produce Auction will be on the south side of the road. If you are coming from Hume/Fillmore, it will be on the south side of the road just before you enter the village. You can’t miss it!!

Auction Days: Usually lasts an hour or two depending on how much is up for sale.
Tuesday – 10:00 AM till over
Friday – 10:00 Am till over

For questions call: This is an Amish Auction and contact by phone is only available at specific times.
585-567-8640 from 9:00 till about noon on auction days
585-567-4312 other days between 8:00 – 8:30 AM

Genesee Valley Produce Auction, LLC

Genesee Valley Produce Auction, LLC

Update 5/24/16: The auction has resumed for 2016 and will continue until the end of October. The first annual Quilt, Furniture & Craft Auction will be held June 25th, 2016.

Centerville Amish Community

Centerville Amish Community

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Baked Ham

Posted on March 28, 2016 by Leave a comment

One of our favorite ways to eat ham is a home cooked, baked ham with cloves and pineapple. Several times a year, half and whole hams are placed on sale with a significant price discount. Easter is a common time for ham to go on sale. These hams can be cooked when purchased or frozen for use months later. The meat of a baked ham has a flavor similar to deli ham which is very expensive. However you can bake a ham yourself for about 75% less per pound. Baking and preserving a large ham is relatively simple and easy to do. These hams are already fully cooked, but are normally cooked a little more to add flavor.

Ready to remove pineapple slices & cloves - then slice

Ready to remove pineapple slices & cloves – then slice

When selecting a half ham you may notice two different types of ham shapes in the packaging. A whole ham is originally cut from the pig with the portion connected to he hip on one end (butt end) and the part connecting to the knee on the other end (shank end). When they cut a whole ham in half to be packaged, the shape of the half ham will look a little different depending on which half of the ham you are looking at. The bone inside the ham will look different. The ham cooks and tastes the same, however if you cook a lot of hams, you may develop a preference.

The simplest way to prepare a baked ham is to follow the simple directions on the package, by taking off the packaging, placing it in a baking pan, and putting it in the oven for the specified amount of time, at the specified temperature. Usually baking at 325 degrees for 15-20 minutes per pound. A fresh ham would need to be completely cooked for a much longer period of time.

Whole cloves

Whole cloves

Our recipe is for a ham baked with cloves and pineapple, which adds a clove spice flavor and a sweet pineapple juice flavor enhanced with honey. A clove is the dried flower bud of a tropical tree, grown in the Maluku Islands, India and Pakistan, with the botanical name Syzygium aromatic. We purchased KrogerĀ® brand cloves which were of very high quality. These cloves were half the price of the branded clove products for the same or better quality.

Typical pre-cooked baking ham

Typical pre-cooked baking ham

Ingredients
1) One half or whole ham with package and plastic “bone” guard removed
2) Whole cloves
3) One can of pineapple slices, juice set aside (although you could also use pineapple chunks)
4) Honey
5) Toothpicks (we were out of toothpicks and substituted popsicle sticks broken in half and carved to a point)

Inserting whole cloves into the ham

Inserting whole cloves into the ham

Putting it all together
1) Pre-heat oven to 325 degrees
2) Place the ham in a baking pan flat side down
3) Insert the cloves an inch or two apart evenly spaced all over the surface of the ham
4) Attach the rings of pineapple with a toothpick evenly spaced over the ham
5) Combine pineapple juice with some honey as a glaze to baste on the ham as it cooks (optional)
6) Place the ham in the oven and bake per directions, 15-20 minutes per pound at 325 degrees
7) Baste 3-4 times with the pineapple/honey juice as the ham cooks
8) When done, remove the ham from the oven, take off the pineapple slices and remove the cloves
9) Wait about 10 minutes before slicing, (however it will be almost irresistible not to sample small bits of ham and pineapple)

Adding pineapple rings to the ham

Adding pineapple rings to the ham

We liked adding the pineapple/honey juice basting liquid. You could also do it with just the pineapple juice alone. It does create a sweet tasting accumulation of meat juices in the bottom of the baking pan. We used these meat juices to make a nice ham gravy to be served over mashed potatoes.

When the ham is out of the oven, let it cool down for about 10 minutes. While you are waiting you can remove the pineapple and cloves. If you are going to make gravy from the meat juices, now is the time to transfer the ham to a serving platter. Next drain the meat juices into a sauce pan for making the gravy. We served our dinner with ham, pineapple slices, mashed potatoes and ham gravy, with asparagus. It was delicious!!

Ham dinner!

Ham dinner!

Preparing to store leftover ham

We always have leftover ham and enjoy eating it in a variety of dishes, from simple sandwiches to omelets, scalloped and au gratin potatoes, pizza, split pea soup, etc. We prepare “chunk” ham, sliced ham and diced ham. The first step is to go through each piece separating the chunks along natural separation points. Next we trim away the fat and any other undesireable pieces. We save the bone for making split pea soup. You could also add the bone to mustard, turnip or collard green preparation.

Preparing leftover ham for storage

Preparing leftover ham for storage

Depending on how much ham is left and what cuts are available, we prepare the ham accordingly. When in doubt, we freeze the ham as a chunk, which can be thawed later. Using this method, we have a lot of options for using the ham in the future.

Sliced ham for sandwiches, diced ham for various recipes

Sliced ham for sandwiches, diced ham for various recipes

We package the ham according to our expected use. Since we use the ham a little at a time, our packages are small. We make sure that our packages are labeled with the date. It is important not leave the ham in the freezer for more than 1 or 2 months, according to foodsafety.gov.

Freeze the ham in labeled packages, in amounts you can easily use

Freeze the ham in labeled packages, in amounts you can easily use

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Honey Extraction

Posted on February 12, 2016 by Leave a comment

At the current time we only have a few honey bee hives and we do not have enough volume to use our large honey extractor. When we extract the honey from only a few shallow supers, we use the old antique honey extractor that we bought second hand over 30 years ago. This extractor is easy to operate and easy to clean. We are fortunate to have some beautiful fresh honeycomb to extract.

Frames of honey ready to be extracted

Frames of honey ready to be extracted

The extractor is a basically a round tub with a drain and a hand crank. The crank turns a mechanism that holds two frames of honey at a time. Once one side of the frame is extracted, the frame is reversed and the other side is extracted. The honey flows outside of the frames by centrifugal force. Once it hits the side of the tub, it gradually flows to the bottom of the extractor. After extracting several frames, the honey is drained from the bottom of the extractor.

Antique hand crank honey extractor

Antique hand crank honey extractor

The honey bees seal the wax honey cells with a cap once they are filled and the honey is ready to be sealed. The honeybees use their wings to create ventilation in the hive to remove excess water from the flower nectar, from which the honey is made. Once the sugar content of the honey is the proper concentration, the cells are sealed. Prior to extraction, the caps need to be removed. To do his we use an electric hot knife which cuts and melts the caps at the same time. The removed wax caps are saved to use later to make candles.

The wax caps are removed with a hot knife

The wax caps are removed with a hot knife

Once both sides of a frame have had its caps removed, it is immediately placed in the extractor. When two frames are ready for extraction, the extracting process can begin. You need to have two frames in the extractor for proper balance. An evenly balanced extractor will have less vibration and the honey will be easier to extract.

The caps removed the frame is ready to go into the extractor

The caps removed the frame is ready to go into the extractor

After the honey has been extracted it can be stored in large plastic five gallon storage containers. A spigot can be attached to the container for bottling. When the honey is initially extracted it will contain a variety of natural impurities which originate from the original frame. The impurities in the honey include, wax pieces, and propolis. Propolis is a “glue” secreted by the honeybees to fill spaces in the hive. If you let the storage container set for a few days the impurities will rise to the top. The honey is heavier than the impurities. This allows the pure raw honey to be dispensed from the bottom of the container for bottling.

Emptying the extractor

Emptying the extractor

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Parmesan Popovers – Bridget Moynahan Recipe

Posted on January 13, 2016 by Leave a comment

We read a recipe for Parmesan Popovers in a recent issue of People Magazine which was written by Bridget Moynahan. We decided to make the recipe and it turned out very well. We are re-publishing it here with just a couple small changes.

On the Platter! They Shrunk a Little!

On the Platter! They Shrunk a Little!

Ingredients:
2 Tablespoons of butter to grease the muffin tin.
2 Large eggs at room temperature.
1 Cup of Half-n-Half.
1 Cup of all purpose or bread flour.
1/2 teaspoon of salt.
1 Tablespoon of finely grated Parmesan Cheese

Just Out of the Oven!

Just Out of the Oven!

Putting it all together:
1) Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
2) Grease a muffin pan for 12 muffins with the butter.
3) In a medium bowl combine the eggs and half-n-half and uniformly mix.
4) In a large bowl mix flour, salt, and grated parmesan cheese.
5) Pour in the egg mixture and beat until only tiny lumps remain.
6) Preheat the muffin pan in the oven for about 2 minutes.
7) Right before you take the pan out of the oven, whisk or beat the batter again.
8) Fill each cup in the muffin pan just a little less than half way.
9) Bake for 25 minutes without opening the oven!!

Split Open!  Ready to Eat!

Split Open! Ready to Eat!

There are a multitude of ways to eat a popover, warm with butter, or butter and jam, or filled with a strawberry & whipped cream; the list goes on!! I ate mine with butter and strawberry jam and it was luscious!!

Kitchen Tips!
If you forgot to take your eggs out of the refrigerator to bring them up to room temperature, we put them in a bowl of hot tap water while we are preparing the recipe and they warm up significantly in about 10 minutes.

Makes: about 12 popovers
Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 25 minutes

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Honey Pizza Dough

Posted on December 14, 2015 by Leave a comment

We started adding honey to our pizza dough many years ago when my children were young and as adults they are also making this dough. Now the grandchildren are asking to have the recipe, as well. You remember that we are beekeepers. So here it is!!

Honey Pizza Dough Ingredients

Honey Pizza Dough Ingredients

Ingredients:
3 Cups of Flour (we have made this with a variety of flour types. We prefer white bread flour.
1 tsp of salt (mixed with the dry flour)
1 Egg (we warm the egg in warm water after taking it out of the refrigerator, this helps keep the dough warm for rising)
1 Cup of warm (almost hot) water (but not too hot to kill the yeast)
1/4 tsp of sugar (which we add to the warm water and yeast)(this helps the yeast grow)
1 Packet of yeast (which we add to the warm water and sugar) (we prefer rapid rise yeast)
1/8 cup of corn/vegetable oil (we think olive oil gives the dough an undesirable flavor)
1/8 cup of honey (more or less depending on your taste for a sweet dough)

Proofing the Yeast!

Proofing the Yeast!

Instructions:
- Add the flour and salt to a large bowl and mix thoroughly.
- Combine the cup of warm water, yeast, and sugar, mix and let set to proof.
- Place the egg in some warm water so that it can warm up to, at least room temperature, while waiting for the yeast to proof.
- In a quarter cup measure first add the 1/8 cup of oil and then add the 1/8 cup of honey.
- When the yeast has proofed, combine all the ingredients in the big bowl with the flour and mix until a uniform dough is formed. If the dough seems too moist, you can add some
flour until you can easily form it into a nice moist ball.
- When you have a ball formed, place a towel over the bowl and set in a warm place.
- Let rise for about an hour. (while you are waiting for it to rise, prepare your pizza topping).
- At this point the dough is ready to spread into your pizza pan.
- If you want thin crust, spread it thinly, for thicker crust spread it less thin.
- This dough will make 3 medium thin crust pizzas, two medium thick crust pizzas, or one large pizza.
- Preheat your oven to 425 degrees and bake for about 10 minutes. Then check if it is baked to your preference.

Letting the Dough Rise!

Letting the Dough Rise!

Comments:
Proofing – Yeast is a living organism. Proofing is when you allow the yeast to grow to verify that the yeast is alive and will make the dough rise. If the yeast is dead, it will not make the dough rise. The yeast, water, sugar mixture will form a “foam” on top, if the yeast is alive.
Oil and Honey do not mix – If you put the oil in the cup first and then the honey, the whole mixture will pour out of the cup without sticking.
Homemade Sausage Recipe – http://www.minkhollowfarm.com/making-sausage-from-fresh-ground-pork/

Homemade Pizza!

Homemade Pizza!

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Genesee Valley Produce Auction

Posted on October 11, 2015 by Leave a comment

Genesee Valley Produce Auction
8855 County Road 3
Centerville, NY 14029

1/4 mile east of “downtown” Centerville on the road towards Hume/Fillmore, NY.
Centerville is a small town in northwest Allegany County, NY, at a crossroads. The most notable business in downtown Centerville is Uncle Tom’s Kabin which is a small grocery store. Go 1/4 mile towards Hume/Fillmore and The Genesee Valley Produce Auction will be on the south side of the road. If you are coming from Hume/Fillmore, it will be on the south side of the road just before you enter the village. You can’t miss it!!

Auction Days: Usually lasts an hour or two depending on how much is up for sale.
Tuesday – 10:00 AM till over
Friday – 10:00 Am till over

For questions call: This is an Amish Auction and contact by phone is only available at specific times.
585-567-8640 from 9:00 till about noon on auction days
585-567-4312 other days between 8:00 – 8:30 AM

Genesee Valley Produce Auction, LLC

Genesee Valley Produce Auction, LLC

Update 5/24/16: The auction has resumed for 2016 and will continue until the end of October. The first annual Quilt, Furniture & Craft Auction will be held June 25th, 2016.

The Genesee Valley Produce Auction, LLC in Centerville, NY is in the process of finishing it’s second year as a seasonal local produce auction. It appears to be a growing, successful enterprise. This wholesale produce action is owned and operated for the benefit of the local Amish community, which is part of the community of Centerville, NY. Centerville is a small rural town in Allegany County in western NY State.

Fall Pumpkins and Flowers!

Fall Pumpkins and Flowers!

In an effort to boost the local economy, the auction has been established to furnish an outlet for locally grown produce. This includes Amish and non-amish producers. The auction provides high quality produce to potential buyers which includes small to medium size local roadside produce stands. As the auction becomes more successful and attracts a larger number of bidders, the demand for local produce grown in and around Centerville has increased.

Here is how it works: A buyer or Seller is required to get a number to identify your purchase or sale. This is done in the office. Next, Preview the goods to see what you are interested in bidding upon. Take note of the package size being offered because that will be the minimum purchase you can buy, once you have made a bid. You must listen to the auctioneer, as he will sometimes have instructions regarding the quantity to be purchased with your bid. Usually you can purchase anywhere from one package to the entire lot, at the price you bid. It helps to watch the bidding process for a while before you start bidding. Once you feel comfortable, make your bid. Once you have completed all your bidding, you take your number to the office to pay for your purchase. Then, load up and head for home.

Additionally there is a “Retail” table that has pre-priced small package sizes of fruits, vegetables and baked goods. If you do not need a large quantity of a specific item, you may find it on the retail table. There will be a person near the retail table to take the package number and then you can pay for the item in the office.

Auction Bidding in Progress!

Auction Bidding in Progress!

These photos were taken in late September when the Fall produce is available. Produce that is only available for a short period of time during the year, like concord grapes, pumpkins, and apples need to be purchased during their season. Earlier in the year during the Spring and Summer other produce like hanging flower baskets, or sweet corn, tomatoes, cucumbers are available.

Concord Grapes!

Concord Grapes!

One of the benefits of a local produce market is the potential to purchase unique items such as these walnut log flower baskets with grape vine handles. Although you many not want to buy a whole pallet of hanging baskets, it may be an opportunity to work with your neighbors to save a few dollars by buying in bulk in a wholesale setting. If you are into canning or freezing for your family, it is an economical way to purchase fresh produce in quantities not offered in the grocery store. It is a great adventure to gather a few friends to go visit the auction, find a great deal, and share the bargain you found.

Specialty Flower Baskets!

Specialty Flower Baskets!

Over the past 20 years or so, an Amish community has developed in and around Centerville. It is now very normal to encounter a buggy or two on the road when you travel locally. The Amish have purchased a significant portion of the local real estate where there were once small dairy farms that went out of business in the 1970s and 1980s. The community is complete with homesteads, carpenters, storekeepers, builders, sawmills, a poultry farm, and local produce and greenhouse growers.

Centerville Amish Community

Centerville Amish Community

Centerville is a small town located in the northwestern corner of Allegany Counsty, NY. It is about an hour and fifteen minutes from Buffalo, NY and about an hour and a half from Rochester, NY. It is a rural town with a population of 822. The main occupation is dairy and beef cattle farming. There are also several maple syrup producers. Centerville is located at a high elevation in western NY with hills reaching 2000 feet. This high elevation is associated with ample snowfall in the winter and cooler temperatures in the summer; often 5-10 degrees cooler than Buffalo or Rochester. The beautiful rolling hills make a scenic ride at any time of year.

The Beautiful Rolling Hills of Centerville, NY!

The Beautiful Rolling Hills of Centerville, NY!

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Hawiian Coffee

Posted on September 8, 2015 by Leave a comment

We recently visited the island of Kauai in Hawaii where they grow a significant portion of the Hawaiian coffee crop. We took a tour at the Kauai Coffee Company and learned a lot about coffee. The Kauai Coffee Company is the largest producer of coffee in the United States of America.

Hawaiian Coffee

Hawaiian Coffee

The coffee trees grow on the relatively steep slopes of the island overlooking the Pacific ocean. The coffee growing area is in a dry environment on the island and the trees are drip irrigated. The dry environment also reduces the number of pests and diseases that effect coffee trees. The trees blossom mainly in early spring, beginning in February or March, but continue to produce blooms into late spring and early summer. The timing of blooming also depends on the variety of coffee being grown. When you look at the developing coffee “cherries”, they are different sizes depending on when the flowers were pollinated. It is the seeds within the cherry that develop into the coffee beans. Usually there are two beans per cherry. The trees are trimmed to accommodate mechanical harvesting. The harvester used was adapted from a machine designed to harvest blueberries.

Hawaiian Coffee Trees

Hawaiian Coffee Trees

The coffee flower is very fragrant and is used to produce a coffee blossom honey. This honey crop is very small due to the relatively small acreage of coffee trees and the partial year that the blossoms are available to the honeybees.

Coffee Flower

Coffee Flower

When the coffee cherries begin to ripen they start to turn red. The specific variety of coffee in the photo is a somewhat ever-bearing coffee which can have blooms, young cherries and ripe cherries on the coffee tree all at the same time. The ripe coffee cherries are harvested from mid October through mid December. After the cherries are harvested they are taken immediately for “Wet” processing. During the processing the beans are separated from the pulp, dried, and prepared for storage.

Ripening Coffee Beans

Ripening Coffee Beans

The coffee is ready to be roasted after the beans are harvested and dried. Once the beans are roasted, flavoring oils can be added to add virtually any flavor desired to the coffee beans.

Roasting the Coffee

Roasting the Coffee

If you should happen to visit Kauai, we highly recommend visiting and taking the short tour at the Kauai Coffee Company.

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Late Summer Planted Whitetail Clover

Posted on July 29, 2015 by Leave a comment

In August of 2014 we decided to expand our perennial acreage of Whitetail Institute whitetail clover. The plot areas that we chose were newly cleared areas where annual brassicas had been planted the previous year. We had our ground prepared but were in a little bit of a hurry due to some expected heavy rain. We manually spread our seed with a canvas type cyclone seeder with a hand crank. In one area we over seeded some rye as a nurse crop just to see how it might work.

Late Summer 2014 Planted Whitetail Clover

Late Summer 2014 Planted Whitetail Clover

We were not able to check on this plot again until July of 2015 when we mowed it to about 10 inches tall. You can see how the plot has filled in nicely and has created a great source of food for both our whitetail deer and our honeybees. We hope to get some clover flavored honey.

Whitetail Institute Whitetail Clover

Whitetail Institute Whitetail Clover

When we checked on the plot with the rye nurse crop in July, the rye was about five feet tall with grain heads in the dough stage. A nurse crop basically functions as a protective barrier by providing a wind break, and shade for the germinating clover, helping it to become established in adverse conditions. We hope we mowed the rye in time to kill the seed in the grain heads. If we did not, we may get some secondary germination this fall. The remnants of the rye straw was still visible in July, but will gradually decompose and disappear. The decomposing rye will add calcium and nitrogen to the soil. In an open winter, without snow, you might expect to see a better stand with a nurse crop than you would in a stand without the nurse crop.

Whitetail Clover Planted With a Rye Cover Crop

Whitetail Clover Planted With a Rye Cover Crop

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Small Wildlife Pond

Posted on July 28, 2015 by Leave a comment

Over 50 years ago, just before my father bought this property, the previous owner created this small pond in what was a field at that time. This is a spring fed pond about 60 feed long, 30 feet wide, and about 3 feet deep. Most likely it was made for horses or cattle and possibly for wildlife as he was an avid deer hunter. Over the years it started to become filled in and no longer much of a pond. About three years ago we had it re-dug for about $300.00. It has been fun to see it being used by wildlife. The pond is also near our apiary and it makes a close source of water for the honeybees. The muddy water in the photograph is where deer have recently come to drink.

Small Wildlife Pond South View

Small Wildlife Pond South View

The pond is at the edge of a field where our deer food plots are located, which also makes this spot attractive to the deer. Deer require a water source and this is specially helpful to them in dry periods of the year. It is the only site for quite a distance that has a permanent pool of water that can be used by our local amphibians to lay their eggs in the spring. We have a variety of toads, frogs, and newts which utilize this location.

Small Wildlife Pond North View

Small Wildlife Pond North View

The pond does require some maintenance. Since we have re-dug the pond, we have made an effort to control the vegetation that wants to grow up around the pond. We do this with a combination of herbicide use, a bushhog (rotary cutter), and a string trimmer. We are certain that a lot of additional wildlife species use the pond, they are just more difficult to observe during a casual walk by.

Frog Tadpoles Just Hanging Out!

Frog Tadpoles Just Hanging Out!

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Honeybee Survival Winter 2015

Posted on July 24, 2015 by Leave a comment

The winter in western NY in 2015 was characterized as extremely cold, with a lot of snow and many successive cold days which made it unusually difficult for honeybees to survive the winter. This was our forth year of trying to overwinter honeybee colonies. We had been getting Italian honeybee packages sourced from the state of Georgia. We were not able to keep any of these colonies overwinter. In 2014 we purchased two nucs of Carniolan honeybees from a local beekeeper in Rushford, NY. This beekeeper has 400 hives and has been successful overwintering his hives. One of these two Carniolan colonies survived and was quite vigorous by the first of July 2015. When opening the hive, both deep hive bodies were full of brood and the one super was almost completely filled with honey. There appeared to be little room for additional bees.

Honeybee Winter Survival 2015

Honeybee Winter Survival 2015

We are only able to visit this location occasionally, which forces us to be absentee beekeepers and this leads to making decisions and waiting to see the results some months later. We needed to make two basic decisions 1) How are we going to manage our mite population? 2)How are we going to manage space within the hive? The assumptions are that we have a healthy queen and that we have a mite infestation at some level. Controlling mites and managing space will impact both honey production and overwintering potential for the winter of 2015/2016. We treated this hive with 2 Apiguard trays above the brood chambers to suppress the varroa mites. We additionally added two medium depth Illinois supers plus one hive body on top.

The purpose of adding the hive body on top was done for two reasons 1) As we disassembled the two hives that did not make it through the winter, we had hive body frames that still had some honey in the frames which needed to be cleaned before storing this equipment. 2) We wanted to add additional top space to possibly prevent swarming and/or provide additional storage space for surplus honey. This hive is surrounded by the constant presence of nectar producing white clover flowers. We have established approximately 2 acres of Whitetail Institute Whitetail clover.

You may notice the 3 additional “ventilation” holes in the Illinois supers. We added these holes to provide winter hive ventilation, and to provide an additional hive entrance in deep snow. We made the decision to leave these holes when we added the Illinois supers. We will check this hive in early October to see how the bees adapted to the structure that we have left them. Hopefully the bees will be ready for winter and have left a little honey to share.

Carniolan Honeybee Survives Severe Winter in NY State

Carniolan Honeybee Survives Severe Winter in NY State

Note: The electric fence surrounding the apiary is a “Bear Fence” to keep out the local population of Black Bears. Within days of attending to our apiary, a local beekeeper was a victim of a local bear and her cub.

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